Exercise

Exercise

BETTER PERFORMANCE, BETTER RECOVERY

BETTER PERFORMANCE, BETTER RECOVERY

A SENSORY PRESCRIPTION FOR EXERCISE

Every stage of your workout can be enhanced by engaging the senses. The benefits can be psychological and physiological.

For instance, you’re more likely win at a sport if you wear red. Researchers believe it triggers an in-built mechanism, sharpening, focusing and giving you game.

 

In the book, the exercise chapter lays out an in-depth sensory guide to getting ready, working out and recovery.

Here are some things you can do to assist your exercise routine:

LISTEN TO YOUR MUSIC

Listening to your own music, especially stuff that you really enjoy, gives you better performance than music you’re not familiar with.

Intuitively so, fast music does make you run faster. And if you want to keep a slower pace, listen to slower music. You will perform better, be able to run further and get less tired when the music is congruent.

Fast run, fast music
Slow run, slow music


shutterstock_1413773261

WEAR GARISH PATTERNS

Playful Exercise

Wear bright garish clothing with geometric patterns

In fact, choose sharp angular shapes in everything you have around you, like your water bottle.

Sharp shapes feel more active and energetic. They’ll
spur you on as, surrounded by them, you’ll begin to
act in accordance with your environment.

EXERCISE WITH OTHERS

Especially someone better than you. We’re evolutionarily wired to up our game so we don’t stand out or drop behind.

Women in exercising class

PEPPERMINT IN YOUR WATER

shutterstock_794353369

Peppermint cools, invigorates and opens up your respiratory capacity.

The scent also works perfectly with the other elements of the sensory prescription too – it smells sharp, clean and crisp.

LOOK AT NATURE

Exercising in nature helps you reap even more benefit from your efforts. But you don’t have to be out in the real thing to feel the effects. Even a view, image or film works as well.

Try watching a POV film on an iPad , or even your phone while you run or cycle.


shutterstock_1158679396

DOWNTEMPO RECOVERY

Slow recovery

Research shows that listening to very slow music for 20-30 minutes after a workout helps you cool down and control the body’s cortisol levels – our fight or flight stress hormone.

A selection of extreme chill-out and natural sounds is prescribed; some examples for starters below. Go to the full playlist on Spotify here

An Ending, An Ascent – Brian Eno

To Heal – Underworld

Kokning – Bjorn Torske

Daydream – Nitin Sawhney

Spring 1 – Max Richter, Vivaldi

Next project Healthy Choices

Give yourself the best
chance of beating temptation

 

GET THE BOOK

GET IN TOUCH

GET IN TOUCH

For enquiries related to the book, contact Jon Wood
Otherwise send an email to hello@sensebook.co.uk
Visit sensoryexperiences.co.uk for projects

For enquiries related to the book, contact Jon Wood
Otherwise send an email to hello@sensebook.co.uk
Visit sensoryexperiences.co.uk for projects

For enquiries related to the book, contact Jon Wood
Otherwise send an email to hello@sensebook.co.uk
Visit sensoryexperiences.co.uk for projects

For enquiries related to the book, contact Jon Wood
Otherwise send an email to hello@sensebook.co.uk
Visit sensoryexperiences.co.uk for projects

For enquiries related to the book, contact Jon Wood
Otherwise send an email to hello@sensebook.co.uk
Visit sensoryexperiences.co.uk for projects